Wednesday, September 28, 2005

Some blog entries should come with safety warnings

Like "Should be taken with liberal amounts of chocolate" or "Do not ingest while talking on the phone, as might cause choking".............
I'm shakin' my head over a doozie from a very left-brained friend. Evidently, the implications of his left-brainedness had escaped me. More illusions have been shattered...

Please read the entire post I reference (linkie in post title above), in order to understand the text that follows.

"I have always considered the Psalms to have second-tier status in my mind, as compared to the straight historical narrative format of much of the rest of Scripture. However obscure some of Scripture may be, throwing poetry into the mix just seems to be make matters worse."

"Would be fine if it [the Book of Psalms] just stayed as poetry. But this especially gives me fits each time I see later authors of Scripture refer back to the Davidic psalms and use them as prophetic in nature. Where does the warrant come from, to draw such conclusions from this genre?"

"make matters worse" "this genre" *Elena raises eyebrow* Er? ¿Repite, por favor? A little less disdain, if you please. (Braymp, ya know I still love ya, brother.)

So...the form negates the possibility of the text offering truth? Must one tell (prose) rather than show (poetry)? Hmm?

I sense some postmodern thinking cropping up here---ala How can one KNOW the true message of the author, especially if he couches his message in poetic language/form? Well, to that I ask, "How can one KNOW the true message of the author, even if he states it outright? Aren't all authors 'unreliable narrators' to some degree?"

Does the form make the Truth clearer to the reader? More reliable? Do other forms obscure the Truth or make doubtful the veracity of the existence of the particular truth being conveyed?

True, the non-fiction essay form is similar to the steps and process of the scientific method: hypothesis, experiment and observation, thesis, proof and analysis, and conclusion/theory. Is it because poetry seems to deviate from the scientific method that some look askance at it?

Well, now I have good impetus/inspiration/reason for finishing/tweaking a post on "Why Read/Study/Teach Poetry?"

And maybe my friend can add "Why Study/Practice/Teach Pure Science?" to his blog fodder list.

To be continued...

8 comments:

rejoyce said...

haha... you and Mark are like two extremes in my blog/xanga reading world of friends.

=)

FzxGkJssFrk said...

Yeah... I can't remember if I bothered to comment on bray's psalms post, but I was rather bothered by it, as you were. I don't really see you and bray as extremes, though... I think bray is fairly middle-of-the-road. You and changed are probably extremes :) I'm still planning to post on the miracles thing at some point.

Elena said...

Well, I was thinking more personality-wise---that Mark and I are wired very differently, although we do have much in common. I just didn't pick up on the differences when he lived here. It's a fascinating character study... might come in handy in future.

Yeah, theological-philosophically, changed and I are on opposite ends. But I do appreciate his sense of humor.

Anyhoo, I just came across Acts 2 (I'm verifyin' Bible stories for kidlets)---where Peter quotes from some of the Davidic Psalms which were prophetic in nature. I figure that might be proof enough there that the genre (wisdom/poetry) does not negate the reliability of the writings' prophetic aspects. Check it out...

FzxGkJssFrk said...

I think that Mark was actually questioning Peter's appropriation of the Psalms as prophetic, unless I miss my guess. So I don't think he would accept that as proof. I think he's looking for something in the Jewish tradition that asserts David as a prophet, I suppose as an independent check on Peter's claims (which I buy).

Res Ipsa said...

read the 22nd 23 and 24th ps together.

If that isn't foreshawdoing please explain why.

digitalcowboy said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
digitalcowboy said...

Res makes a very good point about 22, 23 and 24.

It might also be interesting to do a quick study on how many times/places Jesus quoted the Psalms. I can think of two off the top of my head. One of them was while nailed to the cross just before he died. He quoted Psalm 22. In fact, it's hardly provable, but many scholars believe and it very much seems, that he quoted the entire 22nd Psalm just before he died.

I can also think of a few Psalms off the top of my head that are clearly historical records and confirmable by some of the "regular" narrative scriptures your friend likes so much.

braymp said...

I only came across this thread just now.